listening, reputation management

The Flip Side of Reputation Management: Listening for Good

12 Comments 06 July 2009

This is the story of the “flip side” of online reputation management – when monitoring one’s online reputation brings an unexpected bounty of good news.

I won an award. A great, wonderful award. How did I learn about the award? A Google alert arrived in my inbox!


I always recommend that companies set up online “listening posts” for mentions of the company name, staff names, and industry keywords, at a minimum.  It is impossible to stay on top of all the chatter and noise online without them. If we want to know what our fans, critics and friends are saying online, we have to be listening to them. You never know when a critic will write about your company in their personal blog, mention an employee personally on Twitter, or talk about your organization’s programming on a host of online forums and social media networks. Unlike Domino’s, we don’t want to be caught unaware of a viral video that puts our company in a bad light.

What we cannot forget is that the flip side of reputation management is listening to the good things people say about your company online.


And that’s what happened to me two days ago. First, the Google Alert arrived at 10pm to my email inbox:


google-alert2

Google Web Alerts only offer a short excerpt of the online mention, which is not often enough to understand the context. It is advisable to click the hyperlink and read it for yourself.  I wanted to know more, so I followed the link back to WebHostMagazine.com and found this:

editors-choice-award

Wow. Pretty cool, I thought.

Two hours later, this TweetBeep (a type of Twitter alert) arrived in my email inbox:

tweetbeep2

So, of course, I traced the alert back to the original Tempus Group online “tweet” and found this:

tempus-group-tweet

Which prompted me to respond with this tweet to Tempus Group:

thank-you-to-tempusgroup

The lesson here? Don’t forget to set up your listening posts!  For monitoring Twitter, I use TweetBeep, Twitterfall, and a TweetDeck “search” is always open for “@askdebra.” I use BoardTracker to listen for keywords mentioned on discussion forums, listservs and chat groups. I use Google Alerts to catch any links or keywords scanned by Google, and I have set up a watchlist on Technorati to monitor certain keywords mentioned in blogs. I also created an alert on Socialmention to pick up anything that the other alerts missed. Of all of them, Google Alerts, Socialmention and TweetBeep are by far the most useful.

In fact without Google Alerts and TweetBeep, I would have missed a great honor and award!

Which listening posts do you use, and which are most helpful?

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  • Jeremy

    Isn’t using TweetDeck’s “mention” column the same as including a search for @askDebra? Does a search column offer something more than the mention column?

    [Reply]

  • Jeremy

    Isn’t using TweetDeck’s “mention” column the same as including a search for @askDebra? Does a search column offer something more than the mention column?

    [Reply]

  • Jeremy- I have a “replies” column that is set to @askDebra. This captures every @ reply directed to me on twitter, and I don’t want to miss out on dialogue directed at me.

    I don’t know if a mentions column is any different – is it?

    [Reply]

  • Jeremy- I have a “replies” column that is set to @askDebra. This captures every @ reply directed to me on twitter, and I don’t want to miss out on dialogue directed at me.

    I don’t know if a mentions column is any different – is it?

    [Reply]

  • Unrelated to my blog about kids activities in Jerusalem, I bought a domain “Extendyourstay.com” a few years ago. I use google alert to tell me anytime that expression is found on a site or blog.
    The most interesting thing i have learned is that it is an expression used often in the UK and recently with the financial crisis there have been blog posts in the US of how to “extend your stay” in your foreclosed house. I think I’ll stick with trying to sell my domain in the UK 🙂

    [Reply]

  • Unrelated to my blog about kids activities in Jerusalem, I bought a domain “Extendyourstay.com” a few years ago. I use google alert to tell me anytime that expression is found on a site or blog.
    The most interesting thing i have learned is that it is an expression used often in the UK and recently with the financial crisis there have been blog posts in the US of how to “extend your stay” in your foreclosed house. I think I’ll stick with trying to sell my domain in the UK 🙂

    [Reply]

  • Wow, what a coincidence! ^^
    Very well done. I was actually working on the post regarding reputation management as well, but it’s yet to published though. Looks like it’s an issue that we all noticed and tend to be very attentive about. Good to know.

    @wchingya
    Social/Blogging Tracker

    [Reply]

  • Wow, what a coincidence! ^^
    Very well done. I was actually working on the post regarding reputation management as well, but it’s yet to published though. Looks like it’s an issue that we all noticed and tend to be very attentive about. Good to know.

    @wchingya
    Social/Blogging Tracker

    [Reply]

  • Ching-
    Reputation management is really important – it’s on all of minds lately, I guess. I’ll look for your post, and if I miss it, do please return back here and link to it in the comments section.

    Joanna- great story about listening!

    [Reply]

  • Ching-
    Reputation management is really important – it’s on all of minds lately, I guess. I’ll look for your post, and if I miss it, do please return back here and link to it in the comments section.

    Joanna- great story about listening!

    [Reply]

  • annawoods04

    On the flip side, not monitoring your online reputation could also mean that you are unaware that absolutely nothing is being written about you. This is equally damaging as it means that no one is actually reading your blog and your personal brand is not attracting any attention. This can be damaging not only to the future of your blog, but also to your career.

    [Reply]

  • Thanks, Anna. Good point that hasn't been mentioned yet!

    [Reply]

About

Debra Askanase is an experienced digital engagement strategist, non-profit executive, and community organizer. She works with mission-driven organizations to develop digital strategies and campaigns that engage, create trust, and move stakeholders to action. Debra speaks at conferences worldwide on the intersection of technology, social media, and nonprofit organizations.

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